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Dalmation Toadflax Tales of Woe

LINK TO VIDEO FILEhttp://imedia.unr.edu/Tahoe/79_DalmationToadflax.asx (01:45)
TitleDalmation Toadflax Tales of Woe
Author/CreatorCobourn, John; Purdy, Shelly; Segale, Heather M.
Related item(s)Press Release available at http://www.tahoe.unr.edu/resources/Segment079.pdf
Date Original2004-08-10
Summary/DescriptionLake Tahoe Report Segment #79 - "Dalmation Toadflax Infestation" (Air Date: August 10, 2004). Larry Hughes from Douglas County weed control discusses the work being done to control the spread of the Dalmation Toadflax, an fast spreading invasive dry weed that has been introduced in the Tahoe region and that has the potential to destroy native habitat and contribute to erosion.
SubjectNoxious weeds -- Control -- Tahoe, Lake, Region (Calif. and Nev.)
Invasive plants -- Control -- Tahoe, Lake, Region (Calif. and Nev.)
LocationLake Tahoe (Calif. and Nev.)
Tahoe, Lake (Calif. and Nev.)
CollectionThe Lake Tahoe Report
Original PublisherLake Tahoe Environmental Education Coalition (http://www.lteec.org)
Electronic PublisherUniversity of Nevada, Reno - Department of Teaching and Learning Technologies
Ordering and Permissions InformationFor more information, contact the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, http://www.lteec.org or 775-832-4138.
Formatvideo/wmv
Date Digital2005-03-14
RelationRequires Windows Media Player
Resource TypeMoving Image
Languageeng
Contributing InstitutionUniversity of Nevada, Reno
TranscriptionSegment 79: Dalmatian Toadflax Air Date: August 10, 2004 Tease @ 14:58 "This sea of yellow may look pretty but it is actually a noxious weed that is harming the native environment. I'm Shelly Purdy, I'll tell you all about the Dalmatian Toadflax in tonight's Lake Tahoe Report." Anchor Intro: Anyone who has weeded a flower bed or dealt with dandelions in their lawn knows that dealing with weeds can be a real pain. Most people use some sort of herbicide to kill unwanted weeds. But when you're dealing with noxious plants in the Tahoe area, spraying chemicals isn't always an option. Shelly Purdy takes a look at new research to control the Dalmatian Toadflax in tonight's Lake Tahoe Report. ((Take PKG)) ((Track 1)) The Dalmatian Toadflax is an invasive dry land weed that spreads easily through underground roots and seed. It likes dry gravelly sites like this spot here in the Gardnerville area. ((sot @ 8:26 Larry Hughes, Douglas County weed Control Supervisor)) "We know that this particular infestation here was started with a very small population of three plants which were brought from Tahoe to the valley here." ((Track 2)) Those three plants that were brought in as an ornamentals over the years have spread throughout the valley, up Kingsbury grade and over into the Tahoe basin. The concern with Dalmatian Toadflax is it comes in and takes over. It destroys native habitat. Animals don't eat it. Its root system contributes to erosion. And it spreads very easily. ((s/u @ 14:30 Shelly Purdy)) "The frightening thing about Dalmatian Toadflax is it grows directly underneath and in this case straight through sagebrush." ((sot @ 10:42)) "The sagebrush is normally olliopathic so what it's doing is it puts a poison down that stops other things from growing. The Toadflax doesn't care." ((track 3)) Researchers are using this area to test ways to apply a herbicide to the weeds that will kill the Toadflax and nothing else around it. ((sot @ 12:12)) "The herbicide is put on a clipper and the plants are clipped and we're trying to see if enough chemical will get in the plant to kill the root without harming the environment." ((Track 4)) A very labor intensive and time consuming proposition, but a much better alternative to allowing this non-native noxious weed take over. With the Lake Tahoe Environmental Education Coalition, I'm Shelly Purdy for KOLO NC8. Anchor Tag: Dalmatian Toadflax can be identified with its bright yellow snapdragon shaped flowers. If you think you have this weed growing in your yard, contact your local cooperative extension office.

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