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New Water Quality Planning Tool for Tahoe: The TMDL

LINK TO VIDEO FILEhttp://imedia.unr.edu/Tahoe/48_TMDL.asx (01:42)
TitleNew Water Quality Planning Tool for Tahoe: The TMDL
Author/CreatorCobourn, John; Purdy, Shelly; Segale, Heather M.
Related item(s)Press Release available at http://www.tahoe.unr.edu/resources/Segment048.pdf
Date Original2003-12-30
Summary/DescriptionLake Tahoe Report Segment #48 - "Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)" (Air Date: December 30, 2003). Dave Roberts from the Lahontan Water Resource Board discusses the role of secci disk technology in measuring the amount of sediment and other contaminants that can flow into Lake Tahoe every day without negatively affecting the clarity.
SubjectWater -- Pollution -- Total maximum daily load
Water quality -- Standards
Water quality management -- Tahoe, Lake (Calif. and Nev.)
LocationLake Tahoe (Calif. and Nev.)
Tahoe, Lake (Calif. and Nev.)
CollectionThe Lake Tahoe Report
Original PublisherLake Tahoe Environmental Education Coalition (http://www.lteec.org)
Electronic PublisherUniversity of Nevada, Reno - Department of Teaching and Learning Technologies
Ordering and Permissions InformationFor more information, contact the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, http://www.lteec.org or 775-832-4138.
Formatvideo/wmv
Date Digital2005-03-14
RelationRequires Windows Media Player
Resource TypeMoving Image
Languageeng
Contributing InstitutionUniversity of Nevada, Reno
TranscriptionSegment 48 - Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Air Date: 12/30/03 Anchor Intro: T-M-D-L is an acronym you're going to be hearing a lot about in the coming years when people talk about Lake Tahoe. Shelly Purdy explains in tonight's Lake Tahoe Report. TAKE PKG ((Track 1)) TMDL stands for Total Maximum Daily Load. It's a technical way to call the amount of sediment and other contaminants that can flow into Lake Tahoe every day without negatively affecting the clarity. Scientists measure clarity with the aid of a secchi disk. By watching the disk as it goes deeper and deeper into the water, they can measure just how clear Lake Tahoe is. Currently that depth is about 67 feet. The goal is to turn back the clock by three decades and achieve a clarity depth of 90 feet. ((sot @ 3:22 Dave Roberts, Lahontan Water Resource Board)) "The TMDL is looking to determine a more accurate estimation of the current pollutant load and also tell us what needs to be reduced in order to achieve historic clarity of Lake Tahoe." ((track 2)) To figure that out, policy makers are looking at the data collected from the dozens of research projects currently underway at Tahoe. Researchers are measuring the effects of nearshore turbidity, stream channel erosion, sediment loading from stormwater, and algae growth. The results of these experiments will help determine just how much dirt and grime Lake Tahoe can take. Once that level is established, it will be up to the agencies, communities and property owners at Tahoe to figure out a way to meet those standards. ((sot @ 5:25)) "As long as we can achieve the required pollutant load reduction then we're okay with strategies that demonstrate they can achieve that pollutant load reduction." ((Track 3)) The overall goal is to make Tahoe clearer and bluer that it is today. The important part isn't how they do it…just that it gets done. With the Lake Tahoe Environmental Education Coalition, I'm Shelly Purdy for KOLO NC8. Anchor Tag: Fore more information on TMDL visit our website at KOLOTV.com and click on the ????? icon.

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